Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is a lead-acid battery?
  2. What is important to know about Lead-acid batteries?
  3. What is important to know when handling batteries?
  4. What’s the meaning of CCA, CA, AH and RC?
  5. How many types of lead-acid batteries?
  6. What are wet Cell, Gel-Cell and Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) batteries?
  7. What is sulfation?
  8. What causes a battery to fail?
  9. How can GreenBatt help?
  10. How can Battery Equaliser help?
  11. What problems does Battery Equaliser addressed?
  12. Are there any temperature limitations with the use of Battery Equaliser?
  13. What should I know for handling battery solutions?
  14. What do I do if I splash some battery acid in my eyes or skin?
  15. What is the meaning of Battery Reconditioning?
  16. What are the benefits from using reconditioned battery?
  17. When should I recondition my battery?
  18. How do I decide if it is worth treating of my old battery?
  19. What batteries can be reconditioned?
  20. What are the safety tips we should know when recondition a battery by ourselves?
  21. After I treat my battery, how do I know if there is any improvement?
  22. Who do we talk to about reconditioned batteries?
  23. How do I maintain reconditioned batteries?
  24. When should I replace a battery?
  25. How do I check my car battery?
  26. How do I check my charging system?

 

 
1. What is a lead-acid battery?

A lead-acid battery is a storage battery in which the electrodes are grids of lead containing lead oxides that change in composition during charging and discharging, and the electrolyte is dilute sulfuric acid. The Lead Acid battery is made up of plates, lead, and lead oxide (various other elements are used to change density, hardness, porosity, etc.) with a 35% sulfuric acid and 65% water solution. This solution is called electrolyte which causes a chemical reaction that produce electrons. When you test a battery with a hydrometer you are measuring the amount of sulfuric acid in the electrolyte. If your reading is low, that means the chemistry that makes electrons is lacking. Sulfur is resting to the battery plates and when you recharge the battery the sulfur returns to the electrolyte.

   
 
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2. What is important to know about Lead-acid batteries?
 

Lead-acid batteries contain sulfuric acid and only trained and authorized personnel should handle them. When talking about lead-acid batteries, people usually call sulfuric acid "battery acid" or the "electrolyte". An electrolyte is general term used to describe a non-metallic substance like acids such as sulfuric acid or salts that can conduct electricity when dissolved in water.

  • Use extreme care to avoid spilling or splashing the sulfuric acid solution. It can destroy clothing and burn the eyes and skin.
  • Always wear safety goggles and protective clothing (gloves and aprons). A face shield may also be necessary.
Batteries can be weight from about 14 to 27 kg, so practice safe lifting and carrying procedures to prevent back injuries. Use a battery carrier to lift a battery, or place hands at opposite corners.
   
 
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3. What is important to know when handling batteries?

Always use extreme caution when handling lead-acid batteries and electrolyte. Wear gloves, goggles and protective clothes. The sulphuric acid in lead-acid batteries will burn skin and eyes and destroy cotton and wool clothing. Adopt these specific measures for maximum safety:

  • Someone should be within range of your voice to come to your aid when you work near batteries;
  • Have plenty of fresh water and soap nearby in case battery acid contact skin, clothing, or eyes;
  • Wear complete eye protection and clothing protection. Avoid touching eyes while working near batteries. Wash your hands when done;
  • If acid contacts skin or clothing, wash immediately with soap and water. If acid enters eyes, immediately flood eyes with running cool water for at least 15 minutes and get medical attention immediately;
  • Baking soda neutralizes lead acid battery electrolyte. Keep a supply on hand in the area of the batteries;
  • NEVER smoke or allow a spark or flame in vicinity of a battery or generator;
  • Be extra cautious when working with metal tools on, and around batteries. Potential exists to short-circuit the batteries or other electrical parts which may result in a spark which could cause an explosion;
  • Remove personal metal items such as rings, bracelets, necklaces, and watches when working with a battery. A battery can produce a short-circuit current high enough to weld a ring, or the like, to metal causing severe burns;
  • If a remote or automatic generator start system is used, disable the automatic starting circuit and/or disconnect the generator from its starting battery while servicing to prevent accidental starting during servicing.
   
 
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4. What’s the meaning of CCA, CA, AH and RC?

Well these are the standards that most battery companies use to rate the output and capacity of a battery.

Cold cranking amps (CCA) is a measurement of the number of amps a battery can deliver at -17 °C for 30 seconds and not drop below 7.2 volts. So a high CCA battery rating is good especially in cold weather.

Cranking amps (CA) measured at 0°C. This rating is also called Marine cranking amps (MCA). Hot cranking amps (HCA) is seldom used any longer but is measured at 27 ° C.

Reserve Capacity (RC) is a very important rating. This is the number of minutes a fully charged battery at 27 °C will discharge 25 amps until the battery drops below 10.5 volts.

An amp hour (AH) is a rating usually found on deep cycle batteries. If a battery is rated at 100 amp hours it should deliver 5 amps for 20 hours, 20 amps for 5 hours, etc.

   
 
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5. How many types of lead-acid batteries?

Basically there are 2 types of batteries: starting (cranking) batteries and deep cycle (marine/golf cart) batteries. The starting battery (SLI starting lights ignition) is designed to deliver quick bursts of energy (such as starting engines) and have a greater plate count. The plates will also be thinner and have somewhat different material composition. The deep cycle battery has less instant energy but greater long-term energy delivery. Deep cycle batteries have thicker plates and can survive a number of discharge cycles. Starting batteries should not be used for deep cycle applications. The so-called Dual Purpose Battery is only a compromise between the 2 types of batteries.

   
 
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6. What are wet Cell, Gel-Cell and Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) batteries?

Wet Cell ,Gel Cell, and Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) are various versions of the lead acid battery. The wet cell comes in 2 styles: serviceable, and maintenance free. Both are filled with electrolyte. The Gel Cell and the AGM batteries are specialty batteries that typically cost twice as much as a premium wet cell. However Gel cell and AGM batteries do not tend to sulfate or degrade as easily or as easily as wet cell, there is little chance of a hydrogen gas explosion or corrosion when using these batteries. Gel Cell and some AGM batteries may require a special charging rate. Careful consideration should be given to the AGM battery technology for applications such as Marine, RV, Solar, Audio, Power Sports and Stand-By Power etc. If you don't use or operate your equipment daily; this can lead premature battery failure; or depend on top-notch battery performance then spend the extra money. Gel Cell batteries still are being sold but the AGM batteries are replacing them in most applications. There is a little confusion about AGM batteries because different manufactures call them different names; some of the popular ones are sealed regulated valve, dry cell, non spillable, and sealed lead acid batteries. In most cases AGM batteries will give greater life span and greater cycle life than a wet cell battery. It is very common for individuals to use the term GEL CELL when referring to sealed, maintenance free batteries. But be very careful when specifying a battery charger, many times we are told by customer they are requiring a charger for a Gel Cell battery and in fact the battery is not a Gel Cell.

AGM: The Absorbed Glass Matt construction allows the electrolyte to be suspended in close proximity with the plates active material. In theory, this enhances both the discharge and recharge efficiency. Actually, the AGM batteries are a variant of Sealed VRLA batteries. Popular usage high performance engine starting, power sports, deep cycle, solar and storage battery. The AGM batteries we sell are typically good deep cycle batteries and they deliver best life performance if recharged before the battery drops below the 50 percent discharge rate. If these AGM batteries are discharged to a rate of 100 percent the cycle life will be 300 plus cycles and this is true of most AGM batteries rated as deep cycle batteries.

GEL: The gel cell is similar to the AGM style because the electrolyte is suspended, but different because technically the AGM battery is still considered to be a wet cell. The electrolyte in a GEL cell has a silica additive that causes it to set up or stiffen. The recharge voltages on this type of cell are lower than the other styles of lead acid battery. This is probably the most sensitive cell in terms of adverse reactions to over-voltage charging. Gel Batteries are best used in very deep cycle application and may last a bit longer in hot weather applications. If the incorrect battery charger is used on a Gel Cell battery it will cause poor performance and premature battery failure.

   
 
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7. What is sulfation?

When lead sulfate is left in the battery for a period of time, it crystallizes and becomes a hard sulfate that coats the surface of the electrode plates. This phenomenon is called sulfation. Because hard lead sulfate is a non-conductive material, when it coats the electrode plates, it causes a reduction in the area needed for the electro-chemical reactions. It also reduces the batteries’ active materials needed to maintain a high capacity. The causes of sulfation are numerous, for examples:

  • Batteries sit too long between charges. As little as 24 hours in hot weather and several days in cooler weather.
  • Battery is stored without some type of energy input.
  • "Deep cycling" an engine starting battery. Remember these batteries can't stand deep discharge.
  • Undercharging of a battery, to charge a battery (lets say) to 90% of capacity will allow sulfation of the battery using the 10% of battery chemistry not reactivated by the incomplete charging cycle.
  • Heat of 38°C+, increases internal discharge. As temperatures increase so does internal discharge. A new fully charged battery left sitting 24 hours a day at 43°C for 30 days would most likely not start an engine.
  • Low electrolyte level - battery plates exposed to air will immediately sulfate.
  • Incorrect charging levels and settings. Most cheap battery chargers do more harm than good. Cold weather is also hard on the battery. The chemistry does not make the same amount of energy as a warm battery. A deeply discharged battery can freeze solid in sub zero weather.
  • Parasitic drain is a load put on a battery with the key off.
   
 
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8. What causes a battery to fail?

Exposure to heat is likely the biggest enemy. Heat kills batteries. The warmer the cells, the shorter the life is. The cells inside the pack are always a few degrees warmer than the temperature of the housing. When a car is not in use and the battery is naturally discharged, the battery sulfates. Not maintaining the proper water level in the battery can also make a battery fail.

Average battery life has become shorter as energy requirements have increased. In fact 80% of all battery failure is related to sulfation build-up. This build up occurs when the sulfur molecules in the electrolyte (battery acid) become so deeply discharged that they begin to coat the battery's lead plates. Before long the plates become so coated that the battery dies.

There are ways to greatly increase battery life and performance. All the products we sell are targeted to improve performance and battery life. The Greenbatt’s professional electronic devices that reverse and prevent of sulfation. Also Battery Equaliser a chemical battery additive has proven itself very effective in improving battery life and performance.

   
 
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9. How can GreenBatt help?

Greenbatt’s facility provide quality charging and discharging system for recondition process for new and used batteries. With completed process you will find much less cost then you are currently paying for repeatedly purchase new batteries, you will be surprised at the quality and price difference that Greenbatt offers.
There are many types of companies that can benefit from our Reconditioned Batteries, mainly there are 2 types:

  1. Companies that need and use batteries for their vehicles and equipment.
  2. Companies that offer services dealing with vehicles, machinery and equipment, which could offer battery replacement as an additional service.
Companies such as Used Car Lots, Fleet Vehicle Companies, Car Rental, Auto Auctions, Delivery Companies, Distribution Companies etc.
   
 
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10. How can Battery Equaliser help?

Battery Equaliser is a non-corrosive, non flammable, water base liquid battery treatment formulated to extend the life and performance of any new or used lead acid battery. Battery Equaliser is recommended for use in autos, boats, golf carts, motorcycles, solar, trucks, RV's, electric forklift batteries, and any other lead acid battery. This product has been tested and proven to be the No.1 battery additive worldwide for the last 25 years!
Battery Equaliser improves battery chemistry. This stops shedding and prevents sulfation from occurring in new batteries, and breaks up existing sulfation in older batteries. Battery Equaliser returns batteries as close to new as possible.

   
 
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11. What problems does Battery Equaliser addressed?

Problems addressed by the use of Battery Equaliser include:

Gassing

Towards the end of charging, the battery cell cannot absorb all of the energy from the gasses, hydrogen and charging current supply. Through electrolysis, excess energy breaks down the water through into its component oxygen. The oxygen is liberated at the positive plates and the hydrogen at the negative. When a battery is completely charged, all of the energy, except the 'resisistance loss', is consumed in this electrolysis. During a recharge, gassing is first noticed when the cell voltage reaches 2.15- 2.2 volts per cell and increases as the charge progresses. At full charge, when most of the excess energy is converted to gas, the amount of hydrogen liberated is about one cubic foot per cell for each 63 ampere hours input. A 4% content of hydrogen in the air may be hazardous. The above mentioned value may be used to relate the maximum amount from a given battery to the size of the room in which it is located.

Mossing

This term is sometimes used to describe the possible deposition of a sponge like layer of lead on the negative plates or strap. This material was originally shed from the plates (predominantly the positive) in very fine particles and circulated throughout the cell during 'gassing' which:

  • fills the porous separator
  • falls towards the base of the cell
  • attaches to both the positive and negative plates

When in contact with either plate, it is changed to the active material of that plate. On the positive plate, the particles are non cohesive and will fall away, this is not so towards the negative. Such material on the negative plate is quite cohesive and thus adheres to, and builds up on the top edge and the exposed spine of the negative plate grid. It will accumulate to such an extent that it will form a bridge through the separator and around thus causing the negative and the positive to partially 'short circuit'. The accumulation of any appreciable amount of moss is usually an indication of overcharging.

Sediment

There is a tendency for some of the active material on the surface of the plates to separate from the main body of the applicable plate paste and fall to the bottom of the cell jar. Through years of experience, batteries have been identified which are poorly serviced or used beyond their operational specification will not only shed vast volumes of red oxide, but also burst their retaining tubes in a short period of time. We have discovered that batteries which are regularly undercharged form large sediment crystals which also inhibit full charge potential. The battery charger current is wasted trying to convert these crystals into active material. It cannot be done through charging alone. A chemical means must be introduced to break them down, open the structure and dispose of the sediment crystals.

   
 
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12. Are there any temperature limitations with the use of Battery Equaliser?

Battery Equaliser is a non-corrosive, non flammable, water base liquid battery treatment formulated to extend the life and performance of any new or used lead acid battery. Battery Equaliser is recommended for use in autos, boats, golf carts, motorcycles, solar, trucks, RV's, electric forklift batteries, and any other lead acid battery. This product has been tested and proven to be the No.1 battery additive worldwide for the last 25 years!
Battery Equaliser improves battery chemistry. This stops shedding and prevents sulfation from occurring in new batteries, and breaks up existing sulfation in older batteries. Battery Equaliser returns batteries as close to new as possible.

   
 
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13. What should I know for handling battery solutions?

  • Pour concentrated acid slowly into water: Do NOT add water into acid - the water tends to sit on top of the heavier (more dense) acid. The water can become hot enough to spatter.
  • Use nonmetallic containers and funnels.
  • Recap any electrolyte container and store it in a safe place at floor level.
  • Do not store acid in hot locations or in direct sunlight.
  • Do not store electrolyte solution on shelves or any location where the container can overturn.
  • Do not squeeze or puncture a container with a screwdriver or other instrument. The acid solution may splash on face, hands, or clothing.
  • Do not fill a new battery with electrolyte solution while it is in the vehicle. Fill the battery while it is on the floor, before installation.
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    14. What do I do if I splash some battery acid in my eyes or skin?

    If eyes are splashed with acid,

    • Use an emergency eyewash/shower station if solution is splashed into the eyes;
    • Immediately flush the contaminated eye(s) with clean, lukewarm, gently flowing water for at least 20-30 minutes, by the clock, while holding the eyelid(s) open;
    • If irritation persists, repeat flushing. Neutral saline solution may be used as soon as it is available;
    • DO NOT INTERRUPT FLUSHING. If necessary, keep the emergency vehicle waiting;
    • Take care not to rinse contaminated water into the unaffected eye or onto the face;
    • First aiders should avoid direct contact. Wear chemical protective gloves, if necessary;
    • Quickly transport the victim to an emergency care facility. Flush any area of your body contacted by battery acid immediately and thoroughly.
    If the skin is splashed with acid,
    • As quickly as possible, flush the contaminated area with lukewarm, gently flowing water for at least 20-30 minutes, by the clock;
    • If irritation persists, repeat flushing. DO NOT INTERRUPT FLUSHING. If necessary, keep emergency vehicle waiting;
    • Under running water, remove contaminated clothing, shoes and leather goods (e.g., watchbands, belts);
    • Transport the victim to an emergency care facility immediately;
    • Discard contaminated clothing, shoes and leather goods.
       
     
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    15. What is the meaning of Battery Reconditioning?

    Every day millions of batteries all over the world are thrown away only because they have stopped working. Batteries of cars, motorcycles, heavy equipment, trucks, golf carts and those used in hospitals, military and industrial farms are discarded unnecessarily. Usually most of the batteries die due to the build up or sulphation on the plates of the battery. It is actually build up of a gas, which hinders the contact of electrolyte with plates. This in turn makes the battery to stop holding the charge and stop producing electricity.

    Reconditioning of a battery is to remove the sulphation by letting in some additives and making the battery rest for some time so that the sulphation breaks off on the plate. Some of the professionals in the battery industry have invented rechargers, which have an option of recondition too.
    A question maybe asked that if battery rechargers are available in the market then why recondition? The answer to this is that battery chargers only charge battery for use but cannot avoid sulphation on them. Once you recondition them, they can be charged for a 100 per cent performance.

       
     
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    16. What are the benefits from using reconditioned battery?

  • Higher level of customer service
  • GB provides additional testing and services
  • Full replacement warranties
  • Many warranties are fully transferable
  • Specialized batteries – just call GB and we deliver
  • GB delivers and picks your old ones
  • A professional company with full technical support from our US principal.
  • Road-side assistance
  • On site mobile service – if you have big batteries GB operators will come to you.
  • Battery life extender – prevents vehicle down time – save on repairs, overtime and customer service issues – treat your batteries before they die
  • Implement a preventative battery maintenance program and prevent problems
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    17. When should I recondition my battery?

    The earlier you treat a battery, the better. The battery will maintain its health and will have an even longer service life. The newer the battery, the more likely you can double, triple or even quadruple it´s expected service life. Take note ­the battery must be functional. Sulfation starts from time of manufacturing to the time it gets to the end user, which could be 4 to 6 months. Batteries that are not treated have a shorter life span. Batteries that are treated with the Greenbatt’s System extend the life and improve the performance. Our additive also coats the plates of the battery so that sulfation does not reoccur. The charger and Additive will not revive physically damaged batteries or batteries with dead cells.

       
     
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    18. How do I decide if it is worth treating of my old battery?

    First, the battery needs to be in sound mechanical condition. Start by measuring the voltage in each cell. There can be no dead cells. The voltage should be even across the cells and preferably +2.1 volts per cell. If you find uneven voltage, rapid charge the battery for 15-30 minutes and recheck the voltage. Use a hydrometer to check that the electrolyte´s specific gravity is similar in all cells. If hydrometer readings are relatively even (regardless of the colour red, orange, green) and voltage is relatively even, the battery is suitable for recondition.

       
     
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    19. What batteries can be reconditioned?

    All lead-acid batteries can be reconditioned including deep-cycle, back-up batteries, car, trucks, forklifts, boats, golf carts. You?ll get the best performance from a battery that is reconditioned within 1 to 4 years old.

       
     
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    20. What are the safety tips we should know when recondition a battery by ourselves?

  • Always use extreme caution when handling lead-acid batteries and electrolyte. Wear safety gloves, goggles and protective clothes;
  • Inspect for defective cables, loose connections, corrosion, cracked cases or covers, loose hold-downs and deformed or loose terminal posts;
  • Replace worn or unserviceable parts;
  • Tighten cable clamp nuts with the proper size wrench. Avoid subjecting battery terminals to excessive twisting forces;
  • Use a cable puller to remove a cable clamp from the battery terminal;
  • Remove corrosion on the terminal posts, hold-down tray and hold-down parts;
  • Use a tapered brush to clean dirt from the battery terminals and the cable clamps;
  • Use a battery carrier to lift a battery, or place hands at opposite corners;
  • Do not lean over a battery;
  • Always be caution when handling battery solutions, follow emergency procedures if splash solutions to the eyes or skin;
  • Charge batteries in a designated, well-ventilated area;
  • Do not attempt to recharge a frozen battery;
  • Follow the manufacturer's recommendations for charging rates, connections and vent plug adjustment;
  • Unplug or turn the charger off before attaching or removing the clamp connections. Carefully attach the clamps in proper polarity to the battery;
  • Rinse off batteries and clean terminals before recharging;
  • Fill sulfuric acid (electrolyte) to the prescribed level before charging to reduce the possibility of the electrolyte heating up excessively. If water is
  • added, use distilled water, not tap water;
  • Turn off the charger before disconnecting the cables from the battery.
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    21. After reconditioned my battery, how do I know if there is any improvement?

    Usually untreated batteries get worse with use. After treatment done by Greenbatt, performance of the battery has been improved, you will generally "feel" improvements very quickly such as improved starting, better spark/ignition, reduced alternator load, brighter headlights, faster charging and slower discharge. If you have access to battery conductance testing equipment, we suggest you can do the following to verify actual improvement of the battery performance. First, test the battery and record results, then, we treat the battery, after that you make a test. There will already be an improvement of the Cold Cranking Amps (CCA). Retest the battery weekly for the next three weeks. You will see improvement every week.

       
     
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    22. Who do we talk to about reconditioned batteries?

    Contact with Greenbatt’s representative.

       
     
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    23. How do I maintain reconditioned batteries?

    You should check that the water levels are properly maintained. Use only mineral free water. Distilled water is best. Don't overfill battery cells especially in warmer weather. The natural fluid expansion in hot weather will push excess electrolytes from the battery. Also make sure that the battery is not charged for short periods of time. Batteries should always be slow charged on a 2 to 5 amps charger with an automatic shut off every six months to a year depending on your climate. The battery should be cleaned using a baking soda and water mix; cable connection needs to be clean and tightened. Many battery problems are caused by dirty and loose connections. A serviceable battery needs to have the fluid level checked. To prevent corrosion of cables on top post of batteries, use a small bead of silicon sealer at the base of the post and place a felt battery washer over it. Coat the washer with high temperature grease or petroleum jelly (Vaseline), then place cable on the post and tighten. Coat the exposed cable end with the grease. Most of people don't know that just the gases from the battery condensing on metal parts cause most corrosion. Greenbatt’s battery maintenance personnel will always be at your service.

       
     
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    24. When should I replace a battery?

    The amount of charge a battery can hold gradually decreases due to usage and aging. Specified to deliver 100% capacity when new, the battery should be replaced when the capacity drops to below 80% of the nominal rating. Some organizations may use different end-capacities as a minimal acceptable performance threshold. Most car batteries will last 2-4 years depending on the quality and where you live.

       
     
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    25. How do I check my car battery?

    Wear protective eye wear and clothing and remove all jewelry when checking your battery and charging system. To check a battery surface voltage, remove the positive terminal protective cover. Connect the positive(+) side meter lead (red) to the positive side battery terminal. Connect the negative(-) side meter lead (black) to the negative battery terminal. With the vehicle not running and the car sitting over night the battery voltage should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts.

    Most batteries wear out every 2 to 4 years( some even shorter period) and need to be replaced. Always replace your battery with a suitable battery to assure proper operation. Check with our Greenbatt representative for a suitable battery replacement.

       
     
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    26. How do I check my charging system?

    Check the ground wires to make sure they are in place and making good contact, especially the battery cable ground connection to the motor.  If this checks out okay, you probably have a faulty alternator.

       
     
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